Public Works

Waste Management:

 

The City operates 2 refuse trucks daily covering residential and commercial accounts, 5 days a week
Commercial accounts are serviced on a pre-set schedule either daily or as needed

Recycling Schedule:

****EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 2013 – THE CITY OF JEANNETTE MAINTENANCE GARAGE WILL NO LONGER BE A COLLECTION OR DROP OFF POINT FOR E-WASTE.   E-WASTE IS DEFINED AS ALL OBSOLETE OR OUTDATED COMPUTERS, TELEVISIONS, CELL PHONES, PRINTERS, PDAs, AND ALL OTHER DEVICES COMMONLY USED IN OFFICES, HOMES, AND BY PEOPLE ON THE GO.****
adobe-PDF-iconClick below to view PDF of the schedules

Contact Information

City Garage - 724-527-4023
Treasurer’s Office – 724-527-4000 ext 17

Residential

Homes are serviced weekly with curb side pickup of trash. All refuse must be bagged in minimum 25 gal garbage bags and placed at curbside.

Regulations

There is a 40# weight limit for bags or garbage cans.

Restrictions

Building materials will not be picked up. These materials can be removed by renting a dumpster from the city through City Hall.

Snow Removal:

The City of Jeannette currently has 5 dump/snow removal trucks in our fleet. Typical snow events are handles with a 3 man crew dividing the City into 3 zones. Main routes are our 1st priority with side roadways 2nd and paved alleys 3rd. In the event of a larger storm event we will bring additional manpower in to handle any situation and keep our roadways safe.

Storm Drains:
What we feed into our storm drains can poison our rivers.

When the rain falls and the snow melts, a flood of water runs off our roofs, roads and yards and down into our streets. Everything the water touches is swept down those streets and fed directly into our storm drains. And then flows out into our rivers: the major source of our drinking water. Trash, paint, oil, fertilizers, animal waste, anything in the path of the storm water can find its way to our rivers through our storm drains. But there is something we can do about it. In fact, a lot of dedicated people and municipalities are working on it right now. You can help too. Use environmentally friendly lawn and garden products. Properly dispose of oil, paints and other household chemicals. And please, don’t litter the street or the landscape. Ask and discover how to keep our rivers from going down the drain.

Drinking Water:
What goes into our rivers impacts what goes into your glass.

Ever wonder where the water in your glass comes from? For most of us, it comes from our rivers. But when rain falls and snow melts, the resulting storm water can run down hills, flow through creeks and streets, and overwhelm our aging sewer systems. Everything this water touches—from the chemicals in our yards, to the motor oils in our streets, and even raw sewage—is washed into our major source of drinking water: our rivers. But there is a solution. A lot of dedicated people and municipalities are working on it. And you can help too. Use environmentally friendly lawn and garden products. Never pour oil or paint in a storm drain. Check with your local community about disposing of or recycling paint, oil and other chemicals. Because when it comes to clean water, we all drink from the same faucet.

Fish and Wildlife:
Guess where you’re really putting your lawn fertilizer?

Every year the snow melts, the rain falls, and the water that runs off your yard carries fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides into our creeks and streams and finally, into our rivers. There, it deposits pollutants that can harm fish, wildlife, and vegetation. It also compromises our major source of drinking water: our rivers. But we can all do something about it and still keep our yards looking beautiful. In fact, a lot of dedicated people and municipalities are already working on it. And you can help too. Plant more trees and shrubs so you’ll have less bare lawn surface that allows storm water runoff. Use eco-friendly lawn fertilizers. If you need pesticides and herbicides, limit their use. You’ll be helping to protect our most valuable liquid asset: our water.

Roof Flushing:
Is your roof flushing raw sewage into our rivers?

Whenever it rains, water flows off hundreds of thousands of roofs, into downspouts and down our storm drains. If our downspouts are connected to the underground sewer lines, storm water can overload the lines. Causing sewage to overflow into our rivers: the source of the water we use everyday. Fortunately, there’s a solution. Many dedicated people and municipalities are working on it. You can help too. Check with your local community about whether you need to disconnect your downspouts from the sewer system. Connect a rain barrel to your home’s downspout so the water can be captured, conserved and used later on your yard or garden. Plant trees and other vegetation to reduce storm water runoff from your yard. Because the only thing that should flow into our rivers is clean water.

Click Here to Download Homeowner’s Guide to Protecting Our Watershed (376 KB)